If you're fascinated by all things space and physics related, this page is for you.

The Universe on Facebook

IS IT A RIVER? IS IT A NEBULA? NO IT’S A CRATER!Recently we’ve posted a few articles on the NASA spacecraft Dawn and its observations of the giant asteroid Vesta. Here’s another!This is a composite image of the Antonia Crater, composed by Dawn’s Framing Camera (FC). To produce this image, several observations taken in multiple FC filters were combined. Here red is the ratio of brightness between wavelengths of 750nm and 440 nm (ratio of red to violet); green is the ratio of wavelengths 750nm to 920nm (ratio of red to infrared) and blue is the ratio of brightness at 440 to 750nm (ratio of violet to red). Keep in mind that the resolution of the original images (before compiling) were about 60m per pixel. While the colour scheme may seem very complicated at first, it has been specifically chosen to highlight particularly interesting chemicals. For example, yellow/green depicts the relative strength of a ferrous absorption band – brighter yellow/green is a higher relative strength of this band. As a results, astronomers can distinguish different materials inside the crater wall compared to that of the ejecta. -CJImage credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDAFurther Reading: 1, 2 -lots of great images! View high resolution

IS IT A RIVER? IS IT A NEBULA? NO IT’S A CRATER!

Recently we’ve posted a few articles on the NASA spacecraft Dawn and its observations of the giant asteroid Vesta. Here’s another!

This is a composite image of the Antonia Crater, composed by Dawn’s Framing Camera (FC). To produce this image, several observations taken in multiple FC filters were combined. Here red is the ratio of brightness between wavelengths of 750nm and 440 nm (ratio of red to violet); green is the ratio of wavelengths 750nm to 920nm (ratio of red to infrared) and blue is the ratio of brightness at 440 to 750nm (ratio of violet to red). Keep in mind that the resolution of the original images (before compiling) were about 60m per pixel. 

While the colour scheme may seem very complicated at first, it has been specifically chosen to highlight particularly interesting chemicals. For example, yellow/green depicts the relative strength of a ferrous absorption band – brighter yellow/green is a higher relative strength of this band. As a results, astronomers can distinguish different materials inside the crater wall compared to that of the ejecta. 

-CJ

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

Further Reading: 1, 2 -lots of great images!

  1. youtastelikepoison reblogged this from the-actual-universe
  2. the-metal-bug reblogged this from the-actual-universe
  3. mountain-mermaid reblogged this from the-actual-universe
  4. pretty-painting reblogged this from the-actual-universe
  5. unicornspacetravel reblogged this from the-actual-universe
  6. sammythek5 reblogged this from the-actual-universe
  7. cherry-bombomb reblogged this from the-actual-universe
  8. theemopoet reblogged this from sista-socrates
  9. sista-socrates reblogged this from the-actual-universe
  10. respectthereal reblogged this from the-actual-universe
  11. yes-siree-dodd reblogged this from the-actual-universe
  12. anitathewolf reblogged this from the-actual-universe
  13. dammitsally reblogged this from the-actual-universe
  14. panjaitans reblogged this from the-actual-universe
  15. 1998bl11 reblogged this from the-actual-universe
  16. lovely-daisies-darling reblogged this from the-actual-universe
  17. lillianbroom reblogged this from the-actual-universe
  18. thedecadedropout reblogged this from the-actual-universe
  19. 1trickybizkit reblogged this from the-actual-universe
  20. sunflowerfieldssforever reblogged this from the-actual-universe
  21. embersandauroras reblogged this from the-actual-universe