If you're fascinated by all things space and physics related, this page is for you.

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Q
Can I just say that I love, really love this blog? It's so beautiful and it really awakens the little scientist inside of me. :3
A

YASSSS! That’s what we like to hear. Thank you for reading and feel free to drop in the inbox anytime.

Many people object to “wasting money in space” yet have no idea how much is actually spent on space exploration. The CSA’s budget, for instance, is less than the amount Canadians spend on Halloween candy every year, and most of it goes toward things like developing telecommunications satellites and radar systems to provide data for weather and air quality forecasts, environmental monitoring and climate change studies. Similarly, NASA’s budget is not spent in space but right here on Earth, where it’s invested in American businesses and universities, and where it also pays dividends, creating new jobs, new technologies and even whole new industries.
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth (via we-are-star-stuff)

(Source: thedragoninmygarage, via ccjbssxx)

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Spiral galaxy NGC 4911 in the Coma Cluster

A long-exposure Hubble Space Telescope image shows a majestic face-on spiral galaxy located deep within the Coma Cluster of galaxies, which lies 320 million light-years away in the northern constellation Coma Berenices.

The galaxy, known as NGC 4911, contains rich lanes of dust and gas near its centre. These are silhouetted against glowing newborn star clusters and iridescent pink clouds of hydrogen, the existence of which indicates ongoing star formation. Hubble has also captured the outer spiral arms of NGC 4911, along with thousands of other galaxies of varying sizes. The high resolution of Hubble’s cameras, paired with considerably long exposures, made it possible to observe these faint details.

NGC 4911 and other spirals near the centre of the cluster are being transformed by the gravitational tug of their neighbours. In the case of NGC 4911, wispy arcs of the galaxy’s outer spiral arms are being pulled and distorted by forces from a companion galaxy (NGC 4911A), to the upper right. The resultant stripped material will eventually be dispersed throughout the core of the Coma Cluster, where it will fuel the intergalactic populations of stars and star clusters.

Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA). Acknowledgment: K. Cook (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA) View high resolution

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Spiral galaxy NGC 4911 in the Coma Cluster

A long-exposure Hubble Space Telescope image shows a majestic face-on spiral galaxy located deep within the Coma Cluster of galaxies, which lies 320 million light-years away in the northern constellation Coma Berenices.

The galaxy, known as NGC 4911, contains rich lanes of dust and gas near its centre. These are silhouetted against glowing newborn star clusters and iridescent pink clouds of hydrogen, the existence of which indicates ongoing star formation. Hubble has also captured the outer spiral arms of NGC 4911, along with thousands of other galaxies of varying sizes. The high resolution of Hubble’s cameras, paired with considerably long exposures, made it possible to observe these faint details.

NGC 4911 and other spirals near the centre of the cluster are being transformed by the gravitational tug of their neighbours. In the case of NGC 4911, wispy arcs of the galaxy’s outer spiral arms are being pulled and distorted by forces from a companion galaxy (NGC 4911A), to the upper right. The resultant stripped material will eventually be dispersed throughout the core of the Coma Cluster, where it will fuel the intergalactic populations of stars and star clusters.

Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA). Acknowledgment: K. Cook (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA)

distant-traveller:

Milky Way rising above spectacular lightning display

The rise of the Milky Way and a spectacular lightning display in Mersing, Malaysia on June 28, 2014.

Image credit and copyright: Justin Ng
View high resolution

distant-traveller:

Milky Way rising above spectacular lightning display

The rise of the Milky Way and a spectacular lightning display in Mersing, Malaysia on June 28, 2014.

Image credit and copyright: Justin Ng

(Source: universetoday.com, via xlightyears)

xlightyears:

nosoundinspace:

what are some good physics/space oriented popular science documentaries? I’ve watched Cosmos (both), Through The Wormhole and BBC’s Wonders and basically anything goes from modern physics and astronomy to classical physics and history of physics. Thank

into the universe with stephen hawking (2010), Voyage to the Planets (2004), the universe (2007), stephen hawking’s universe (1997), how the universe works (2010) :DD

commandmodulepilot:

45 years ago, three astronauts blasted off on a mission to put man on the moon.

(via thedemon-hauntedworld)

mucholderthen:

THE ANDROMEDA GALAXY IN FAR-INFRARED AND X-RAYS Explosive stars in its interior // cooler, dusty stars forming in its many rings.

The image is a combination of observations from the European Space Agency’s Herschel Space Observatory taken in far-infrared light (seen in orange hues), and the ESA’s XMM-Newton telescope captured in X-rays (seen in blues).
Herschel provides a detailed look at the cool clouds of star birth that line the galaxy’s five concentric rings. Massive young stars are heating blankets of dust that surround them, causing them to glow in the longer-wavelength infrared light, known as far-infrared, that Herschel sees.
In contrast, XMM-Newton is capturing what happens at the end of the lives of massive stars. It shows the high-energy X-rays that come from, among other objects, supernova explosions and massive dead stars rotating around companions. These X-ray sources are clustered in the center of the galaxy, where the most massive stars tend to form.

Credit: ESA/Herschel/PACS/SPIRE/J. Fritz, U. Gent; X-ray: ESA/XMM Newton/EPIC/W. Pietsch, MPE  |||  Image and narrative via Wikimedia View high resolution

mucholderthen:

THE ANDROMEDA GALAXY IN FAR-INFRARED AND X-RAYS
Explosive stars in its interior // cooler, dusty stars forming in its many rings.

The image is a combination of observations from the European Space Agency’s Herschel Space Observatory taken in far-infrared light (seen in orange hues), and the ESA’s XMM-Newton telescope captured in X-rays (seen in blues).

  • Herschel provides a detailed look at the cool clouds of star birth that line the galaxy’s five concentric rings. Massive young stars are heating blankets of dust that surround them, causing them to glow in the longer-wavelength infrared light, known as far-infrared, that Herschel sees.
  • In contrast, XMM-Newton is capturing what happens at the end of the lives of massive stars. It shows the high-energy X-rays that come from, among other objects, supernova explosions and massive dead stars rotating around companions. These X-ray sources are clustered in the center of the galaxy, where the most massive stars tend to form.

Credit: ESA/Herschel/PACS/SPIRE/J. Fritz, U. Gent; X-ray: ESA/XMM Newton/EPIC/W. Pietsch, MPE  |||  Image and narrative via Wikimedia

(via naive-bayesian)

ohstarstuff:

"For as long as there been humans we have searched for our place in the cosmos. Where are we? Who are we? We find that we live on an insignificant planet of a hum-drum star lost in a galaxy tucked away in some forgotten corner of a universe in which there are far more galaxies than people. This perspective is a courageous continuation of our penchant for constructing and testing mental models of the skies; the Sun as a red-hot stone, the stars as a celestial flame, the Galaxy as the backbone of night." – CARL SAGAN 

(Photography credit: Michael Goh)