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ooblium:

Visions of Jupiter’s inner and outer atmospheres

theskylightsupforyou:

In the Centre of the Lagoon GalaxyCredit: Hubble Legacy Archive, NASA, ESA, Judy SchmidtTo find out more, visit: http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html

ლ(ಠ益ಠ)ლ That is definitely a nebula, not a galaxy. The title in the source link even says "nebula!"  View high resolution

theskylightsupforyou:

In the Centre of the Lagoon Galaxy
Credit: Hubble Legacy Archive, NASA, ESA, Judy Schmidt
To find out more, visit: http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html

ლ(ಠ益ಠ)ლ That is definitely a nebula, not a galaxy. The title in the source link even says "nebula!" 

cosmicvastness:

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day 2014 August 19
Contrasting Terrains on Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko 
Where should Philae land? As ESA’s robotic spacecraft Rosetta circles toward Comet 67P/ Churyumov-Gerasimenko, a decision must eventually be made as to where its mechanical lander should attempt to touch-down. Reaching the comet earlier this month, Rosetta is sending back detailed pictures of the comet’s unusual nucleus from which a smooth landing site will be selected. 
Pictured above, near the image top, the head of the comet’s nucleus shows rugged grooves, while near the image bottom, the body shows a patch-work of areas sometimes separated by jagged hills. Some of the patch-work areas apparent on both the head and body seem to have fields of relatively smooth terrain. In the connecting area called the neck, however, visible across the image center, a relatively large swath of light-colored smooth terrain appears, punctuated occasionally by large boulders. Rosetta is scheduled to release Philae toward the dark mountain-sized comet nucleus with an anticipated landing date in November.
View high resolution

cosmicvastness:

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day 2014 August 19

Contrasting Terrains on Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko 

Where should Philae land? As ESA’s robotic spacecraft Rosetta circles toward Comet 67P/ Churyumov-Gerasimenko, a decision must eventually be made as to where its mechanical lander should attempt to touch-down. Reaching the comet earlier this month, Rosetta is sending back detailed pictures of the comet’s unusual nucleus from which a smooth landing site will be selected.

Pictured above, near the image top, the head of the comet’s nucleus shows rugged grooves, while near the image bottom, the body shows a patch-work of areas sometimes separated by jagged hills. Some of the patch-work areas apparent on both the head and body seem to have fields of relatively smooth terrain. In the connecting area called the neck, however, visible across the image center, a relatively large swath of light-colored smooth terrain appears, punctuated occasionally by large boulders. Rosetta is scheduled to release Philae toward the dark mountain-sized comet nucleus with an anticipated landing date in November.

earthstory:

Aurora spiral over Norway
The wonderful green spiral was snapped over the rock of Bleik Island 300km inside the Arctic circle. The image was taken from the neighbouring isle of Andoya, a peat covered expanse with some mountains rising above the bogs. The colour is emitted by excited atoms of nitrogen a hundred kilometres up as they are tickled by the energy of a solar flare event. Bleik is famed for one of Europe’s largest puffin colonies.
Loz

Image credit: Frank Olsen via EPOD

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earthstory:

Aurora spiral over Norway

The wonderful green spiral was snapped over the rock of Bleik Island 300km inside the Arctic circle. The image was taken from the neighbouring isle of Andoya, a peat covered expanse with some mountains rising above the bogs. The colour is emitted by excited atoms of nitrogen a hundred kilometres up as they are tickled by the energy of a solar flare event. Bleik is famed for one of Europe’s largest puffin colonies.

Loz

Image credit: Frank Olsen via EPOD

utcjonesobservatory:

Galaxies
This new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows a whole host of colourful and differently shaped galaxies; some bright and nearby, some fuzzy, and some so far from us they appear as small specks in the background sky.
 The most prominent characters are the two galaxies on the left — 2MASX J16133219+5103436 at the bottom, and its blue-tinted companion SDSS J161330.18+510335 at the top. The latter is slightly closer to us than its partner, but the two are still near enough to one another to interact. Together, the two make up a galactic pair named Zw I 136.
 Both galaxies in this pair have disturbed shapes and extended soft halos. They don’t seem to conform to our view of a “typical” galaxy — unlike the third bright object in this frame, a side-on spiral seen towards the right of the image.
 Astronomers classify galaxies according to their appearance and their shape. The most famous classification scheme is known as the Hubble sequence, devised by its namesake Edwin Hubble. One of the great questions in galaxy evolution is how interactions between galaxies trigger waves of star formation, and why these stars then abruptly stop forming. Interacting pairs like this one present astronomers with perfect opportunities to investigate this. A version of this image was entered into the Hubble’s Hidden Treasures image processing competition by contestant Judy Schmidt.
 Caption: ESA  ESA/NASA
View high resolution

utcjonesobservatory:

Galaxies

This new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows a whole host of colourful and differently shaped galaxies; some bright and nearby, some fuzzy, and some so far from us they appear as small specks in the background sky.

 The most prominent characters are the two galaxies on the left — 2MASX J16133219+5103436 at the bottom, and its blue-tinted companion SDSS J161330.18+510335 at the top. The latter is slightly closer to us than its partner, but the two are still near enough to one another to interact. Together, the two make up a galactic pair named Zw I 136.

 Both galaxies in this pair have disturbed shapes and extended soft halos. They don’t seem to conform to our view of a “typical” galaxy — unlike the third bright object in this frame, a side-on spiral seen towards the right of the image.

 Astronomers classify galaxies according to their appearance and their shape. The most famous classification scheme is known as the Hubble sequence, devised by its namesake Edwin Hubble. One of the great questions in galaxy evolution is how interactions between galaxies trigger waves of star formation, and why these stars then abruptly stop forming. Interacting pairs like this one present astronomers with perfect opportunities to investigate this. A version of this image was entered into the Hubble’s Hidden Treasures image processing competition by contestant Judy Schmidt.

 Caption: ESA
  ESA/NASA

jneyer:

The Large Magellanic Cloud is one of my favourite night sky object viewable from the Southern Hemisphere. At a distance of 163,000 light years from earth LMC is considered an irregular type galaxy and the third closest galaxy to our own Milky Way.For the tech specs of this image, it was shot on a Canon 6D with a Canon 90mm tilt-shift lens, which is such a super sharp lens! The exposure was 10 second shutter at f/3.2 ISO 6400. I had to shoot two single exposure frames to get me and the Large Magellanic Cloud in the one shot, and I stitched them together in Auto Pano Giga.Hope you like the shot and feel free to share!Want to know more? Follow me here:http://theartofnight.comhttp://plus.google.com/+markgeehttp://facebook.com/markgphotohttp://500px.com/markg#magellanicCloud #space #silhouette #astrophotography #selfie #markGee #theartofnight #wellington #newZealandhttp://click-to-read-mo.re/p/8PcL/539a6236
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jneyer:

The Large Magellanic Cloud is one of my favourite night sky object viewable from the Southern Hemisphere. At a distance of 163,000 light years from earth LMC is considered an irregular type galaxy and the third closest galaxy to our own Milky Way.

For the tech specs of this image, it was shot on a Canon 6D with a Canon 90mm tilt-shift lens, which is such a super sharp lens! The exposure was 10 second shutter at f/3.2 ISO 6400. I had to shoot two single exposure frames to get me and the Large Magellanic Cloud in the one shot, and I stitched them together in Auto Pano Giga.

Hope you like the shot and feel free to share!

Want to know more? Follow me here:
http://theartofnight.com
http://plus.google.com/+markgee
http://facebook.com/markgphoto
http://500px.com/markg

#magellanicCloud #space #silhouette #astrophotography #selfie #markGee #theartofnight #wellington #newZealand

http://click-to-read-mo.re/p/8PcL/539a6236

spaceexp:

Narrowband image of the Helix Nebula
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spaceexp:

Narrowband image of the Helix Nebula