If you're fascinated by all things space and physics related, this page is for you.

The Universe on Facebook

humanoidhistory:

nugschillinandgrindage:

humanoidhistory:

The LAGEOS I (Laser Geodynamics Satellite), developed and launched by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center on May 4, 1976 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. (NASA)

disco satellite

I couldn’t have said it batter myself. And it was launched in 1976. It all fits.
View high resolution

humanoidhistory:

nugschillinandgrindage:

humanoidhistory:

The LAGEOS I (Laser Geodynamics Satellite), developed and launched by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center on May 4, 1976 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. (NASA)

disco satellite

I couldn’t have said it batter myself. And it was launched in 1976. It all fits.

spacettf:

Spiral Galaxy NGC 5033 and NGC 5005 in Canes Venatici by Oleg Bryzgalov on Flickr.
Tramite Flickr: Explanation: Magnificent island universe NGC 5033 lies some 40 million light-years away in the well-trained northern constellation Canes Venatici. This telescopic portrait reveals striking details of dust lanes winding near the galaxy’s bright core and majestic but relatively faint spiral arms. Speckled with pink star forming regions and massive blue star clusters, the arms span over 100,000 light-years, similar in size to our own spiral Milky Way. A well-studied example of the class of Seyfert active galaxies, NGC 5033 has a core that is very bright and variable. The emission is likely powered by a supermassive black hole. The bright nucleus and rotational center of the galaxy also seem to be slightly offset, suggesting NGC 5033 is the result of an ancient galaxy merger. (Text: apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap120817.html) This picture was photographed during 3 nights in March-April, 2014 in Khlepcha observatory, Ukraine. Equipment: home made reflector 10 in., f/3.8 Mount WhiteSwan-180, camera QSI-583wsg, Tevevue Paracorr-2. Off-axis guidecamera QHY5L-II. LRGB filter set Baader Planetarium. L=32*450 sec. + 19*300 sec. R= 5*600 sec. + 8*300 sec. G= 5*600 sec. + 14*300 sec. B=5*600 sec.+ 13*450 sec., Total 11.5 hours. FWHM 2.44”-3.01” , sum in L channel - 2.76” Processed Pixinsight 1.8, Fitstacker and Photoshop CS6
View high resolution

spacettf:

Spiral Galaxy NGC 5033 and NGC 5005 in Canes Venatici by Oleg Bryzgalov on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:
Explanation: Magnificent island universe NGC 5033 lies some 40 million light-years away in the well-trained northern constellation Canes Venatici. This telescopic portrait reveals striking details of dust lanes winding near the galaxy’s bright core and majestic but relatively faint spiral arms. Speckled with pink star forming regions and massive blue star clusters, the arms span over 100,000 light-years, similar in size to our own spiral Milky Way. A well-studied example of the class of Seyfert active galaxies, NGC 5033 has a core that is very bright and variable. The emission is likely powered by a supermassive black hole. The bright nucleus and rotational center of the galaxy also seem to be slightly offset, suggesting NGC 5033 is the result of an ancient galaxy merger. (Text: apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap120817.html)
This picture was photographed during 3 nights in March-April, 2014 in Khlepcha observatory, Ukraine.
Equipment: home made reflector 10 in., f/3.8
Mount WhiteSwan-180, camera QSI-583wsg, Tevevue Paracorr-2. Off-axis guidecamera QHY5L-II.
LRGB filter set Baader Planetarium.
L=32*450 sec. + 19*300 sec.

R= 5*600 sec. + 8*300 sec.

G= 5*600 sec. + 14*300 sec.

B=5*600 sec.+ 13*450 sec., Total 11.5 hours.
FWHM 2.44”-3.01” , sum in L channel - 2.76”
Processed Pixinsight 1.8, Fitstacker and Photoshop CS6

alxndrasplace:

(NASA)  Recorded on April 15th, this total lunar eclipse sequence looks south down icy Waterton Lake from the Waterton Lakes National Park in Alberta, Canada, planet Earth. The most distant horizon includes peaks in Glacier National Park, USA. An exposure every 10 minutes captured the Moon’s position and eclipse phase, as it arced, left to right, above the rugged skyline and Waterton town lights. In fact, the sequence effectively measures the roughly 80 minute duration of the total phase of the eclipse. Around 270 BC, the Greek astronomerAristarchus also measured the duration of lunar eclipses - though probably without the benefit of digital clocks and cameras. Still, using geometry, he devised a simple and impressively accurate way to calculate the Moon’s distance, in terms of the radius of planet Earth, from the eclipse duration. This modern eclipse sequence also tracks the successive positions of Mars, above and right of the Moon, bright star Spica next to the reddened lunar disk, and Saturn to the left and below.
 
View high resolution

alxndrasplace:

(NASA)  Recorded on April 15th, this total lunar eclipse sequence looks south down icy Waterton Lake from the Waterton Lakes National Park in Alberta, Canada, planet Earth. The most distant horizon includes peaks in Glacier National Park, USA. An exposure every 10 minutes captured the Moon’s position and eclipse phase, as it arced, left to right, above the rugged skyline and Waterton town lights. In fact, the sequence effectively measures the roughly 80 minute duration of the total phase of the eclipse. Around 270 BC, the Greek astronomerAristarchus also measured the duration of lunar eclipses - though probably without the benefit of digital clocks and cameras. Still, using geometry, he devised a simple and impressively accurate way to calculate the Moon’s distance, in terms of the radius of planet Earth, from the eclipse duration. This modern eclipse sequence also tracks the successive positions of Mars, above and right of the Moon, bright star Spica next to the reddened lunar disk, and Saturn to the left and below.

 

humanoidhistory:

Happy birthday to German scientist Petrus Apianus, aka Peter Apian, born in Saxony on April 16, 1495. A mathematician, astronomer, and cartographer, he was a favorite of Charles V of the Holy Roman Empire. In 1540, Apian created Astronomicum Caesareum and dedicated it to his imperial benefactor. It was a sumptuous Renaissance instructive manual that explained, in part, how to use an astrolabe to calculate the altitude of the stars and planets. (Bibliotheque Nationale de France)

ibmblr:

The world’s largest telescope made with data
Look up on a starry night and consider this: in our lifetime we just might find the answers to one of life’s biggest mysteries, and we mean BIG. Dutch research institute, Astron and its international partners are building the world’s largest radio telescope, aka The Square Kilometer Array, to get a glimpse of the origins of the universe. This big telescope is made up of thousands of interconnected smaller telescopes, carefully arranged in fractal patterns to let us look back in time more than 13 billion years—to mere seconds after the universe was created. How on Earth is this possible? By processing exabytes of Big Data (That’s a 1, plus 18 zeroes) in real time. Or roughly 3X the amount of data running through the Internet per day. Amazingly, this will let scientists map out how the universe came to be. Imagine the look on Galileo’s face if he were here to see it.
Watch the Dispatch
Explore more stories →

detectiveinspectordonut:

maybe aliens don’t talk to us because we’re creepy. i mean we send them weird mix tapes and we keep trying to find out where they live

(Source: blunthorsetrauma, via momjeaned)

distant-traveller:

Unusual dusty galaxy NGC 7049

How was this unusual looking galaxy created? No one is sure, especially since spiral galaxy NGC 7049 looks so strange. NGC 7049’s striking appearance is primarily due to an unusually prominent dust ring seen mostly in silhouette. The opaque ring is much darker than the din of millions of bright stars glowing behind it. Besides the dark dust, NGC 7049 appears similar to a smooth elliptical galaxy, although featuring surprisingly few globular star clusters. NGC 7049 is pictured above as imaged recently by the Hubble Space Telescope. The bright star near the top of NGC 7049 is an unrelated foreground star in our own Galaxy. Not visible here is an unusual central polar ring of gas circling out of the plane near the galaxy’s center. Since NGC 7049 is the brightest galaxy in its cluster of galaxies, its formation might be fostered by several prominent and recent galaxy collisions. NGC 7049 spans about 150 thousand light years and lies about 100 million light years away toward the constellation of Indus.

Image credit: NASA, ESA and W. Harris (McMaster University)
View high resolution

distant-traveller:

Unusual dusty galaxy NGC 7049

How was this unusual looking galaxy created? No one is sure, especially since spiral galaxy NGC 7049 looks so strange. NGC 7049’s striking appearance is primarily due to an unusually prominent dust ring seen mostly in silhouette. The opaque ring is much darker than the din of millions of bright stars glowing behind it. Besides the dark dust, NGC 7049 appears similar to a smooth elliptical galaxy, although featuring surprisingly few globular star clusters. NGC 7049 is pictured above as imaged recently by the Hubble Space Telescope. The bright star near the top of NGC 7049 is an unrelated foreground star in our own Galaxy. Not visible here is an unusual central polar ring of gas circling out of the plane near the galaxy’s center. Since NGC 7049 is the brightest galaxy in its cluster of galaxies, its formation might be fostered by several prominent and recent galaxy collisions. NGC 7049 spans about 150 thousand light years and lies about 100 million light years away toward the constellation of Indus.

Image credit: NASA, ESA and W. Harris (McMaster University)

(Source: apod.nasa.gov, via astronomicalillusion)

tlcraig:

humanoidhistory:

The Space Shuttle Columbia races toward space from Cape Canaveral on March 1, 2002. (NASA)

Nerdgasm
View high resolution

tlcraig:

humanoidhistory:

The Space Shuttle Columbia races toward space from Cape Canaveral on March 1, 2002. (NASA)

Nerdgasm

(via thedemon-hauntedworld)

Remember when we told you that the massive galaxy cluster known as El Gordo is packing as much mass as 2 quadrillion suns? We lied.
New information from the Hubble Space Telescope suggests that the supermassive galaxy cluster contains as much mass as 3 quadrillion suns. Before these discoveries, El Gordo was still one of the most massive clusters in the known Universe. Other clusters near this size exist closer to Earth, but El Gordo lies 7 billion light-years away. It is believed that clusters of this mass were very rare in the early Universe.
So why the discrepancy? Researchers believe that El Gordo is actually the result of a massive collision between two galaxy subclusters. The process of merging affects the gases in the cluster as well as the motion of each galaxy, making the process of measurement difficult. In order to get an accurate picture, scientists peered around behind the massive cluster. The sheer mass of El Gordo warps the light coming from background galaxies, and by calculating this effect, known as gravitational lensing, researchers were able to come up with the new estimate of El Gordo’s mass.
The cluster is so large that it doesn’t fit within Hubble’s field of view, so a mosaic image is the next goal. Future telescopes with larger fields of view may give us even better looks at massive, distant objects like El Gordo. 
-RLO
Image: NASA, ESA, and J. Jee (University of California, Davis)
Source View high resolution

Remember when we told you that the massive galaxy cluster known as El Gordo is packing as much mass as 2 quadrillion suns? We lied.

New information from the Hubble Space Telescope suggests that the supermassive galaxy cluster contains as much mass as 3 quadrillion suns. Before these discoveries, El Gordo was still one of the most massive clusters in the known Universe. Other clusters near this size exist closer to Earth, but El Gordo lies 7 billion light-years away. It is believed that clusters of this mass were very rare in the early Universe.

So why the discrepancy? Researchers believe that El Gordo is actually the result of a massive collision between two galaxy subclusters. The process of merging affects the gases in the cluster as well as the motion of each galaxy, making the process of measurement difficult. In order to get an accurate picture, scientists peered around behind the massive cluster. The sheer mass of El Gordo warps the light coming from background galaxies, and by calculating this effect, known as gravitational lensing, researchers were able to come up with the new estimate of El Gordo’s mass.

The cluster is so large that it doesn’t fit within Hubble’s field of view, so a mosaic image is the next goal. Future telescopes with larger fields of view may give us even better looks at massive, distant objects like El Gordo. 

-RLO

Image: NASA, ESA, and J. Jee (University of California, Davis)

Source

Anyone going to watch the Lyrids next week? And maybe take some photos?

Be sure to submit any pictures you want to share of the Lyrid meteor shower happening next week—we’ll post more information soon. 

Also, when looking up viewing times I found an article that said the best time was “after nightfall, before dawn.”

So, basically, when it’s dark out. Thanks for the tip.

(for the record, it will be visible about 3 a.m. local time)