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thenewenlightenmentage:

Traces of One of Universe’s First Stars Detected
n ancient star in the halo surrounding the Milky Way galaxy appears to contain traces of material released by the death of one of the universe’s first stars, a new study reports.
The chemical signature of the ancient star suggests that it incorporated material blasted into space by a supernova explosion that marked the death of a huge star in the early universe — one that may have been 200 times more massive than the sun.
Continue Reading
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thenewenlightenmentage:

Traces of One of Universe’s First Stars Detected

n ancient star in the halo surrounding the Milky Way galaxy appears to contain traces of material released by the death of one of the universe’s first stars, a new study reports.

The chemical signature of the ancient star suggests that it incorporated material blasted into space by a supernova explosion that marked the death of a huge star in the early universe — one that may have been 200 times more massive than the sun.

Continue Reading

thedemon-hauntedworld:

The Slant on Saturn’s Rings
This image from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope shows Saturn’s Southern Hemisphere and the southern face of its rings in Infrared light.
Saturn experiences seasonal tilts away from and toward the Sun, much the same way Earth does, over the course of its 29.5-year orbit. This means that approximately every 30 years, we can catch Saturn with its rings at their maximum tilt of 27 degrees toward Earth and get the best glimpse of Saturn’s South Pole and the southern side of the planet’s rings.
Credit: NASA/ESA and E. Karkoschka (University of Arizona)
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thedemon-hauntedworld:

The Slant on Saturn’s Rings

This image from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope shows Saturn’s Southern Hemisphere and the southern face of its rings in Infrared light.

Saturn experiences seasonal tilts away from and toward the Sun, much the same way Earth does, over the course of its 29.5-year orbit. This means that approximately every 30 years, we can catch Saturn with its rings at their maximum tilt of 27 degrees toward Earth and get the best glimpse of Saturn’s South Pole and the southern side of the planet’s rings.

Credit: NASA/ESA and E. Karkoschka (University of Arizona)

(via ieverydayeverynight)

vertigoheadspace:

fromquarkstoquasars:

Dark Matter Detected? Latest Discovery Has Potential to Explain Mass of Entire Universe
Astronomers may have detected an emission line from a form of dark matter! Read about this amazing discovery at:http://bit.ly/1phWw9k

And it’s pretty, too!

vertigoheadspace:

fromquarkstoquasars:

Dark Matter Detected? Latest Discovery Has Potential to Explain Mass of Entire Universe

Astronomers may have detected an emission line from a form of dark matter! Read about this amazing discovery at:
http://bit.ly/1phWw9k

And it’s pretty, too!

(via ieverydayeverynight)

ageofdestruction:

tenuous: Clouds over Mars, photographed by Mars Express, 6th June 2008.

81°N 248°E to about 24°N 270°E, on the Vastitas Boralis just south of the Rupes Tenuis, a cliff forming part of the edge of the north polar plateau. The dark region in the 2nd image is a small dune sea, and the clouds seen may be high-altitude water-ice clouds. 

Drawn from the martian Classical melange, tenuis is a Latin word meaning thin or fine, from whence the English tenuous.

Composite of 5 frames.

Image credit: ESA. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.

theuniverseatlarge:

The Great Wetherell Refractor

This is quite possibly the coolest *looking* telescope that I’ve ever seen. From the creator, Tim Wetherell:

The Great Wetherell Refractor is a Steampunk telescope on a grand scale. It incorporates the riveted construction and engraved brass circles of many telescopes from the late nineteenth century, yet it’s also modern in it’s use of electronic controls and the best of today’s coated optics. This work is a both a sculpture and a fully functional telescope. It’s not a replica, but a modern working instrument grounded firmly in the tradition of the great Victorian refractors.

Check out more of Tim’s work at http://www.wetherellart.co.uk

(via astrophsics)

thedemon-hauntedworld:

M8 & M20 (DSLR RGB 2013)+(Ha CCD 2014) Contains: NGC 6546, NGC 6530, M 8, Lagoon nebula, Hourglass nebula, NGC 6523, NGC 6526, Trifid nebula, M 20, NGC 6514, The star 9Sgr, The star 7Sgr
Credit: Alberto Pisabarro on Astrobin
View high resolution

thedemon-hauntedworld:

M8 & M20 (DSLR RGB 2013)+(Ha CCD 2014)
Contains: NGC 6546, NGC 6530, M 8, Lagoon nebula, Hourglass nebula, NGC 6523, NGC 6526, Trifid nebula, M 20, NGC 6514, The star 9Sgr, The star 7Sgr

Credit: Alberto Pisabarro on Astrobin

universal-abyss:

Life on Mars? Implications of a newly discovered mineral-rich structure

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE: 19-Aug-2014. Contact: Kathryn Ryan - Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

New Rochelle, August 19, 2014—A new ovoid structure discovered in the Nakhla Martian meteorite is made of nanocrystalline iron-rich clay, contains a variety of minerals, and shows evidence of undergoing a past shock event from impact, with resulting melting of the permafrost and mixing of surface and subsurface fluids. Based on the results of a broad range of analytical studies to determine the origin of this new structure, scientists present the competing hypotheses for how this ovoid formed, point to the most likely conclusion, and discuss how these findings impact the field of astrobiology in a fascinating article published in Astrobiology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available Open Access on the Astrobiology website.

Pic 1: Contact: Kathryn Ryan kryan@liebertpub.com 914-740-2100 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News, Astrobiology
Caption: Astrobiology, led by Editor-in-Chief Sherry L. Cady, Chief Scientist at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and a prominent international editorial board comprised of esteemed scientists in the field, is the authoritative peer-reviewed journal for the most up-to-date information and perspectives on exciting new research findings and discoveries emanating from interplanetary exploration and terrestrial field and laboratory research programs. The Journal is published monthly online with Open Access options and in print. Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the Astrobiology website. Credit: © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. Usage Restrictions: None.

Pic 2: http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/files/2014/04/Mars-NASA-1024x961.jpg

In the article, “A Conspicuous Clay Ovoid in Nakhla: Evidence for Subsurface Hydrothermal Alteration on Mars with Implications for Astrobiology,” Elias Chatzitheodoridis, National Technical University of Athens, Greece, and Sarah Haigh and Ian Lyon, the University of Manchester, UK, describe the use of tools including electron microscopy, x-ray, and spectroscopy to analyze the ovoid structure. While the authors do not believe the formation of this structure involved biological materials, that is a possible hypothesis, and they note that evidence exists supporting the presence of niche environments in the Martian subsurface that could support life.

“This study illustrates the importance of correlating different types of datasets when attempting to discern whether something in rock is a biosignature indicative of life,” says Sherry L. Cady, PhD, Editor-in-Chief of Astrobiology and Chief Scientist at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. “Though the authors couldn’t prove definitively that the object of focus was evidence of life, their research strategy revealed a significant amount of information about the potential for life to inhabit the subsurface of Mars.”

About the Journal: Astrobiology, led by Editor-in-Chief Sherry L. Cady, Chief Scientist at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and a prominent international editorial board comprised of esteemed scientists in the field, is the authoritative peer-reviewed journal for the most up-to-date information and perspectives on exciting new research findings and discoveries emanating from interplanetary exploration and terrestrial field and laboratory research programs. The Journal is published monthly online with Open Access options and in print. Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the Astrobiology website.

About the Publisher: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including New Space and High Altitude Medicine & Biology. Its biotechnology trade magazine, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN), was the first in its field and is today the industry’s most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm’s 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available at the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-08/mali-lom081914.php

universal-abyss: Ah, the desire to find evidence of life on Mars. Here is another tempting find that might be a clue toward that possibility. Still MUCH evidence is required. Intriguing nonetheless.

ooblium:

Visions of Jupiter’s inner and outer atmospheres

theskylightsupforyou:

In the Centre of the Lagoon GalaxyCredit: Hubble Legacy Archive, NASA, ESA, Judy SchmidtTo find out more, visit: http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html

ლ(ಠ益ಠ)ლ That is definitely a nebula, not a galaxy. The title in the source link even says "nebula!"  View high resolution

theskylightsupforyou:

In the Centre of the Lagoon Galaxy
Credit: Hubble Legacy Archive, NASA, ESA, Judy Schmidt
To find out more, visit: http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html

ლ(ಠ益ಠ)ლ That is definitely a nebula, not a galaxy. The title in the source link even says "nebula!"